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journal" is next. ♪ host: this wednesday morning we would love to hear your take on foreign policy. specifically on what the governor -- former governor massachusetts, mitt romney, and president barack obama had said yesterday. specifically yesterday said -- specifically we want your general level confidence in each candidate on the area of foreign policy. here are the numbers to call. for democrats, 202-737-0001. for republicans, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. if you would like to take part in the program, there are different ways to do that. twitter.com/c-spanwj,an.o facebook.com or e-mail at journal@c-span.org. "the baltimore sun" encapsulate the speeches yesterday. they pointed out that president barack obama made an impassioned defense of the expression of freedom worldwide. mitt romney urged other nations to emulate the free economy and suggested that the obama leadership in the middle east has been inadequate and reactive. this is a short piece to start us off from the president at united nations yesterday, talking about the middle east. [video clip] >> i beli
on foreign policy. the war in afghanistan is drawing to a close. the plans have been laid out for troops to return home. what is an acceptable outcome to the war in afghanistan, and what is our responsibility to achieve that outcome after u.s. troops returned? >> we have always had difficult returned with describing that, and as a result we need to get our troops out of afghanistan as quickly as we can. >> before the president's timeline? >> it is time to bring our troops home and stop spending $2 billion a week in afghanistan. we need that money. >> the united states does not have responsibility any longer? >> we cannot rebuild afghanistan for ever. we cannot do that. having unrealistic goals and spending more money is the wrong approach. i want to say on this, all three of my brothers served in the military. our service members are incredible. they will do anything we ask of them. they work hard, they are resourceful, but that means we owe them an obligation to put them out in harm's way when we have clear goals in mind, when it is clear what we're going to do, how we will accomplish i
of decisions, whether it's milosevic or whatever, in the military and foreign policy area? >> well, they should look at our proposals and look at us as people and make up their own minds. when i was a young man, i volunteered for the army. i served my country in vietnam. my father was a senator who strongly opposed the vietnam war. i went to college in this great city, and most of my peers felt against the war as i did. but i went anyway because i knew if i didn't, somebody else in the small town of carthage, tennessee, would have to go in my place. i served for eight years in the house of representatives and i served on the intelligence committee, specialized in looking at arms control. i served for eight years in the united states senate and served on the armed services committee. for the last eight years i've served on the national security council, and when the conflict came up in bosnia, i saw a genocide in the heart of europe with the most violent war on the continent of europe since world war ii. look, that's where world war i started in the balkans. my uncle was a victim of poisonous ga
-- the foreign policy, there was a spike when mitt romney went abroad. i believe aj invited us here and our job is to keep everyone here on the panel on this. >> think you're a very interesting. as our panelists make their presentation, maybe it least two items i thought would be interested to adjust -- the very interesting article and book out now by sasha eisenberg about the fact that the press cannot keep up with political consultants and social that parking experts. reporters basically are way behind the curve in this campaign. we think that is an interesting topic to take a look at. as well as the fact that in a wave of reporters, my impression is it looks like both candidates have succeeded for the most part in talking over the press, especially the traveling press, and making them almost irrelevant to the campaign. let us start off with amy davidson. >> can everybody hear me? i will start by addressing what he does talk about a little bit. even in the title of the panel, is this any way to cover a campaign? there is somewhat of a note of this may which i think -- dismay, which i think a
need a foreign policy based on human rights, not on the procurement of oil resources. we provide for a green a new deal that would directly create jobs. because it creates jobs in the green economy, it allows us to back off these wars for oil and save hundreds of billions of dollars on the bloated military. instead it puts that money into jobs, health care, and education -- the things we need at home to create national security. host: the biggest challenge is getting on the ballot in 50 states. tell us about some of the difficulties you and others have encountered while trying to run and getting on each state ballot? guest: yes, there has been -- i am just now seeing that. a little delay here. the system is designed to keep alternative voices out of the mix. studies show one out of every two voters is not going to vote. that is 90 million eligible voters who will not vote this election. that is twice as many as the number that will vote for barack obama and twice as many as the number that will vote for mitt romney. that means most people do not feel represented by either of thes
with something, and you get touched on some positions. how would you describe foreign policy? how should america face the world? >> we should be the shining begin on the hill. but our military interventions, are going in, and we are determining -- we are replacing one dictator with another dictator. foreign aid is money spent on dictators. it is not spent on people in other countries. it is spent on propping up other governments. we are funding the insurgents in syria, and one-quarter of the insurgents in syria are supposed to be al qaeda. did we not do this in afghanistan? did we not bankroll osama bin laden? what we ought to have learned is that these military interventions make enemies to the united states, people who are affected by this. these drones strikes, yes, we hit the targets, but we wipe out another quarter block. we kill tens of thousands of innocent civilians living in these countries that we are ostensibly there to help. we are just continuing to make more and more enemies. it is no surprise that the unrest in the middle east is occurring right now. i would get out of our embassi
. that needs to be made clear. we have an administration that has foreign policy that is in confusion. it is not clear to our allies. in 2009 we saw student , and no word from this administration. in 2011 the united states stepped forward with a sanction. i am happy european nations have stepped forward with a sanction, but we need to be clear with our ally, israel, and this is not their problem. it is not just a problem in that region. this is a problem for the world. it is estimated in three years the iranians are going to be able to reach the united states. this is our concern, and we have heard nothing from the sun ministration -- from this administration with regards to iran enriching. there is a lack of clarity. i want america to remain a stabilizing force in in the world. we need to have thought, but with lack of leadership, lack of clarification, when our allies do not know what we are doing common we have lost that. >> thank you. senator kerry. >> this is a confusing time after the arab spring. it is hard to find out what is going on in the middle east. they do not call it th
will look at the issue of foreign policy on this year's presidential campaign. a political science professor at norfolk state university will focus on the role of virginia in the election. we will also be joined by the editor in chief of the washington monthly to discuss a recent article in the magazine examining the consumer financial protection juror -- protection bureau. >> september 11, 2001, was a day that changed my life forever. i will go through a presentation, able ally in the account of the historical account of the attack as things transpired that day. a lot of things happened very quickly. i will do my best not to ramble on and go too fast. i would ask you to sit back and clear your mind and put yourself in that room and you'll get a real sense of what it was like to be at the top of the food chain. >> more from a retired lieutenant colonel robert darling. this weekend on american history tv, sunday at 7:30 on c-span3. >> the former ambassador to pakistan says the u.s. needs a new approach in its relationship with that country. he spoke for the first time since returning from isl
callers came up with several points. one of them spoke to foreign policy. you have touched a little bit on that. how would you describe your own at form policy approach? guest: we should not -- we should involve ourselves diplomatically, but that is really it. we should be the shining beacon on the hill. but our military interventions where we are going in and we are determining another foreign dictator -- we are replacing one foreign dictator with another? our foreign aid has not been helping other countries, but propping up other governments. we are finding insurgents in syria? and a quarter of those are supposed to be al qaeda? did we do this in afghanistan? pinki -- and didn't we do this in afghanistan? didn't we ultimately bankroll osama bin laden? we are making enemies of the united states. the strohm strikes, yes, we hit the target, but we white out another quarter block. -- we wipe out another quarter block. we are killing civilians in this country in that were ostensibly there to help. we're continually making more and more enemies. if is no surprise that the unrest in the midd
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9